RSC’s The Tempest at the Barbican

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Gregory Doran directs this incredible and innovative production of one of Shakespeare’s most famous comedies, The Tempest, mixing breath-taking visuals with delicate and funny performances. 

I always seem to watch the best plays just before they’re about to finish; The Tempest, following a successful run in Stratford-Upon-Avon, moved to the Barbican Centre for a seven-week run and is now in it’s final week. I was determined to see it since I had seen all the hype surrounding the ground-breaking technologies used in the show and, after luckily getting myself a front row ticket, I can say it exceeds expectations! If you have the chance to see the show and are interested in Shakespeare even in the slightest I highly suggest you go, you won’t be disappointed!

I’ll start with the performances, in particular Simon Russell Beale’s Prospero and Mark Quartley’s Ariel, the latter being the one who stole the show for me. Continue reading

The Shakespeare Series || The Tempest

* The Shakespeare Series is a new series I’ll be doing here on Reading in the Rain and will involve my good self looking at Shakespeare plays, telling you why you might like to read said play, and then briefly reviewing them! I hope you enjoy 😊 *

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The Tempest

What’s it about?
Prospero – the magician, rightful Duke of Milan, and father to Miranda – employs his spirit Ariel to bring on a tempest in order to gather the men who betrayed him onto his island, to seek revenge for himself and a love for his daughter.  We follow the character’s as they set out on their respective journeys of punishment, love, forgiveness and the fantastical.

Why should you read it?
○ It is beautifully lyrical – Not only does Shakespeare create a vivid image of the island through reported speech but also the recurring references to the environment, the metaphysical, and the mythological are wonderful to read.

The clouds methought would open and show riches
Ready to drop upon me, that when I waked,
I cried to dream again.      

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Book Review: Honor Girl by Maggie Thrash

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“I could tell I was standing too still and breathing too silently. I prayed she didn’t notice, but she must have, she was so close to me.”

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I was sent this book by Walker Books a couple of months ago and I was immediately intrigued by the the idea of it as a ‘Graphic Memoir’. I know that this isn’t the first graphic memoir, in fact there are many that I’d love to get my hands on, but this is actually the first one I have ever read and boy did I enjoy it! If I had read this a while ago it most certainly would be on my list of Top 5 Graphic Novels. It has everything you would want from a graphic memoir; a compelling and moving story, beautiful artwork, and hilarious writing. Let’s briefly sum up the story:

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